There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and racial equity and pay gaps, (2) measuring underlying structural factors that can be determiners of human rights risks, such as business model, corporate culture and governance and (3) moving away from metrics that can generate perverse incentives not to find issues (Caroline Rees and Robert G. Eccles)

Week of 14 September 2020 There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and … Continue reading There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and racial equity and pay gaps, (2) measuring underlying structural factors that can be determiners of human rights risks, such as business model, corporate culture and governance and (3) moving away from metrics that can generate perverse incentives not to find issues (Caroline Rees and Robert G. Eccles)

Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in the world—is a powerful indicator of a growing shift towards investors holding companies accountable for their impacts on human rights and demonstrates to senior leadership that legal compliance is insufficient where the laws fall short of international standards

Week of 14 September 2020 Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in … Continue reading Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in the world—is a powerful indicator of a growing shift towards investors holding companies accountable for their impacts on human rights and demonstrates to senior leadership that legal compliance is insufficient where the laws fall short of international standards

For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on risks and emissions (Subcommittee on Climate-Related Market Risk of the Committee on Market Risk Advisory, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission)

Week of 14 September 2020 For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on … Continue reading For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on risks and emissions (Subcommittee on Climate-Related Market Risk of the Committee on Market Risk Advisory, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission)