Corporate commitments to purpose, such as those espoused by the Business Roundtable in 2019, are not clear indicators of a company’s future performance on social and human capital issues during times of crisis. Rather, companies that have a history of effectively and proactively managing challenging social issues are more likely to perform positively in the face of crises like the COVID-19 pandemic and the movement for social equality (KKS Advisors and Test of Corporate Purpose initiative)

Week of 21 September 2020 Corporate commitments to purpose, such as those espoused by the Business Roundtable in 2019, are not clear indicators of a company’s future performance on social and human capital issues during times of crisis. Rather, companies that have a history of effectively and proactively managing challenging social issues are more likely … Continue reading Corporate commitments to purpose, such as those espoused by the Business Roundtable in 2019, are not clear indicators of a company’s future performance on social and human capital issues during times of crisis. Rather, companies that have a history of effectively and proactively managing challenging social issues are more likely to perform positively in the face of crises like the COVID-19 pandemic and the movement for social equality (KKS Advisors and Test of Corporate Purpose initiative)

The UK Modern Slavery Act of 2015 will undergo changes to strengthen implementation, effectiveness and compliance. The UK Home Office has committed to mandating which areas statements must cover, making statements available on a Government-run reporting service and instituting a single reporting deadline to increase accountability and public awareness. It is also extending reporting requirements to public sector supply chains and will be considering stronger enforcement options, such as civil penalties for non-compliance (Home Office, Government of the United Kingdom)

Week of 21 September 2020 The UK Modern Slavery Act of 2015 will undergo changes to strengthen implementation, effectiveness and compliance. The UK Home Office has committed to mandating which areas statements must cover, making statements available on a Government-run reporting service and instituting a single reporting deadline to increase accountability and public awareness. It … Continue reading The UK Modern Slavery Act of 2015 will undergo changes to strengthen implementation, effectiveness and compliance. The UK Home Office has committed to mandating which areas statements must cover, making statements available on a Government-run reporting service and instituting a single reporting deadline to increase accountability and public awareness. It is also extending reporting requirements to public sector supply chains and will be considering stronger enforcement options, such as civil penalties for non-compliance (Home Office, Government of the United Kingdom)

The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs proposes text for the corporate due diligence and corporate accountability directive that EU Member States would transpose into national law. This new law would apply both to companies in the EU as well as companies providing goods and services in the internal market. It would require companies to conduct due diligence on human rights, environment (including climate change) and governance risks, with specific requirements to engage stakeholders and trade unions, create grievance mechanisms, provide remedy, and ensure boards and senior managers have the necessary responsibility and expertise (The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs)

Week of 21 September 2020 The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs proposes text for the corporate due diligence and corporate accountability directive that EU Member States would transpose into national law. This new law would apply both to companies in the EU as well as companies providing goods and services in the internal market. … Continue reading The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs proposes text for the corporate due diligence and corporate accountability directive that EU Member States would transpose into national law. This new law would apply both to companies in the EU as well as companies providing goods and services in the internal market. It would require companies to conduct due diligence on human rights, environment (including climate change) and governance risks, with specific requirements to engage stakeholders and trade unions, create grievance mechanisms, provide remedy, and ensure boards and senior managers have the necessary responsibility and expertise (The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs)

There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and racial equity and pay gaps, (2) measuring underlying structural factors that can be determiners of human rights risks, such as business model, corporate culture and governance and (3) moving away from metrics that can generate perverse incentives not to find issues (Caroline Rees and Robert G. Eccles)

Week of 14 September 2020 There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and … Continue reading There is a need to quantify and measure human rights impacts in a meaningful, robust way. This should entail (1) measuring data that provides a stronger indicator of actual impacts on people such as freedom of association, ratio of full employees to contract workers, CEO-worker pay ratios, and gender and racial equity and pay gaps, (2) measuring underlying structural factors that can be determiners of human rights risks, such as business model, corporate culture and governance and (3) moving away from metrics that can generate perverse incentives not to find issues (Caroline Rees and Robert G. Eccles)

Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in the world—is a powerful indicator of a growing shift towards investors holding companies accountable for their impacts on human rights and demonstrates to senior leadership that legal compliance is insufficient where the laws fall short of international standards

Week of 14 September 2020 Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in … Continue reading Investor and civil society pressure played a significant role in Rio Tinto’s removal of its CEO and two other senior leaders following the company’s reliance on a legal permit to destroy sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia; this outcome—which impacts the top leadership of one of the largest mining companies in the world—is a powerful indicator of a growing shift towards investors holding companies accountable for their impacts on human rights and demonstrates to senior leadership that legal compliance is insufficient where the laws fall short of international standards

For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on risks and emissions (Subcommittee on Climate-Related Market Risk of the Committee on Market Risk Advisory, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission)

Week of 14 September 2020 For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on … Continue reading For the first time, a U.S. regulatory body has found that climate change poses serious emerging risks to the US financial system, and calls on policymakers to take urgent and decisive steps to address these risks, including by implementing economy-wide carbon pricing, mandatory corporate climate-risk disclosure, and standardized reporting on risks and emissions (Subcommittee on Climate-Related Market Risk of the Committee on Market Risk Advisory, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission)

New evidence shows that revenue from a Myanmar conglomerate (Myanma Economic Holdings – MEHL) finances the Myanmar military and the atrocities committed, including the recent genocide against the Rohingya Muslims. Companies that have business relationships with MEHL are viewed as financing the military’s human rights violations and – faced with MEHL’s secrecy and lack of leverage – have no other option than to disengage responsibly (Amnesty International)

Week of 7 September 2020 New evidence shows that revenue from a Myanmar conglomerate (Myanma Economic Holdings – MEHL) finances the Myanmar military and the atrocities committed, including the recent genocide against the Rohingya Muslims. Companies that have business relationships with MEHL are viewed as financing the military’s human rights violations and – faced with … Continue reading New evidence shows that revenue from a Myanmar conglomerate (Myanma Economic Holdings – MEHL) finances the Myanmar military and the atrocities committed, including the recent genocide against the Rohingya Muslims. Companies that have business relationships with MEHL are viewed as financing the military’s human rights violations and – faced with MEHL’s secrecy and lack of leverage – have no other option than to disengage responsibly (Amnesty International)

When operating in conflict-affected areas, companies have a responsibility to conduct heightened human rights due diligence which includes seeking out conflict-sensitive resources and advisors, incorporating atrocity prevention and conflict prevention tools into due diligence, developing conflict-sensitive operational-level grievance mechanisms, actively engaging local communities and groups, applying a gender-responsive approach, and actively participating in truth and reconciliation processes (UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights)

Week of 7 September 2020 When operating in conflict-affected areas, companies have a responsibility to conduct heightened human rights due diligence which includes seeking out conflict-sensitive resources and advisors, incorporating atrocity prevention and conflict prevention tools into due diligence, developing conflict-sensitive operational-level grievance mechanisms, actively engaging local communities and groups, applying a gender-responsive approach, and … Continue reading When operating in conflict-affected areas, companies have a responsibility to conduct heightened human rights due diligence which includes seeking out conflict-sensitive resources and advisors, incorporating atrocity prevention and conflict prevention tools into due diligence, developing conflict-sensitive operational-level grievance mechanisms, actively engaging local communities and groups, applying a gender-responsive approach, and actively participating in truth and reconciliation processes (UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights)

As companies and investors seek to scale up climate action to meet the targets of the 2015 Paris Agreement, green bonds have become prevalent tools to finance investments in climate mitigation solutions. Yet, they exclude companies and activities with some of the highest greenhouse gas emissions levels. Proposed ‘transition bonds’ can be leveraged to help large emitters reimagine themselves in a world that has renewed priorities for greenhouse gas management and climate resilience (Climate Bonds Initiative and Credit Suisse)

Week of 7 September 2020 As companies and investors seek to scale up climate action to meet the targets of the 2015 Paris Agreement, green bonds have become prevalent tools to finance investments in climate mitigation solutions. Yet, they exclude companies and activities with some of the highest greenhouse gas emissions levels. Proposed ‘transition bonds’ … Continue reading As companies and investors seek to scale up climate action to meet the targets of the 2015 Paris Agreement, green bonds have become prevalent tools to finance investments in climate mitigation solutions. Yet, they exclude companies and activities with some of the highest greenhouse gas emissions levels. Proposed ‘transition bonds’ can be leveraged to help large emitters reimagine themselves in a world that has renewed priorities for greenhouse gas management and climate resilience (Climate Bonds Initiative and Credit Suisse)

Biodiversity loss is a systemic risk, and the unprecedented loss of biodiversity places more than half of the world’s gross domestic product (US$44 trillion) at risk. Institutional investors are urged to take action, including by (1) promoting investor awareness, commitments and initiatives; (2) investing in companies that protect biodiversity; (3) engaging with companies to promote biodiversity objectives; (4) advocating for strong biodiversity regulation; and (5) requesting meaningful data on biodiversity risks and impacts (Principles for Responsible Investment)

Week of 31 August 2020 Biodiversity loss is a systemic risk, and the unprecedented loss of biodiversity places more than half of the world’s gross domestic product (US$44 trillion) at risk. Institutional investors are urged to take action, including by (1) promoting investor awareness, commitments and initiatives; (2) investing in companies that protect biodiversity; (3) … Continue reading Biodiversity loss is a systemic risk, and the unprecedented loss of biodiversity places more than half of the world’s gross domestic product (US$44 trillion) at risk. Institutional investors are urged to take action, including by (1) promoting investor awareness, commitments and initiatives; (2) investing in companies that protect biodiversity; (3) engaging with companies to promote biodiversity objectives; (4) advocating for strong biodiversity regulation; and (5) requesting meaningful data on biodiversity risks and impacts (Principles for Responsible Investment)